Your browser version is outdated. We recommend that you update your browser to the latest version.

Contact Us:
The Harvey County Independent
220 Main St.
Halstead, KS 67056
316-835-2235

Search this site:

May 17, 2018
Harvey County IndependentMay 17, 2018 Harvey County Independent

Burrton Resident Planning Ride On B-17

Posted 5/17/2018

THE “Madras Maiden,” a World War II B-17 bomber, will be in Wichita this weekend for the public to tour and take flights on. Burrton resident Melvin Fast, who served on one of these planes in WWII, plans to be there. THE “Madras Maiden,” a World War II B-17 bomber, will be in Wichita this weekend for the public to tour and take flights on. Burrton resident Melvin Fast, who served on one of these planes in WWII, plans to be there. By Jared Janzen

BURRTON—History buffs with a sense of adventure have an opportunity for a unique experience this weekend. A World War II B-17 airplane called “Madras Maiden” will be available for the public to tour and even take a flight in this Saturday and Sunday at James Jabara Airport in Wichita.

This plane is one of only about eight or nine B-17s from World War II that are still airworthy in the United States.

One of those people checking out the B-17 this weekend will be Burrton resident Melvin Fast, who served on one of these planes during World War II.

Fast, who turns 94 at the end of this month, enlisted in the air force at age 18, right out of high school.

“World War II had started and everyone was going,” he said about his decision to enlist.

He said he was very lucky to end up in the air force because the infantry had a lot higher mortality rates.

Fast flew in a B-17 just like “Madras Maiden” called “Shacks Racks.” He spent almost two years fighting in the war overseas. He served as a waist gunner, ball turret gunner and tail gunner.

The tail gunner position was the least survivable position because that’s where enemy aircraft would usually aim their weapons. The ball turret gunner was a difficult one because the gunner would be confined in a small space for hours at a time.

“That was World War II—everything was terrible,” he said.

To continue reading, please see this week's print edition.

Read the rest of this entry »

Patton Looks Forward To Challenges In New Role

Posted 5/17/2018

ED Patton began work as Sedgwick’s new city administrator on Monday and said he’s had a good first impression of the city. His previous job was city manager in Herrington.ED Patton began work as Sedgwick’s new city administrator on Monday and said he’s had a good first impression of the city. His previous job was city manager in Herrington.By Pilar Martin

SEDGWICK—Sedgwick’s new City Administrator, Ed Patton, was at his new desk bright and early Monday morning for his first day on the job.

“I love to work in a community that is a challenge,” he said. “Sedgwick hasn’t been in an administrative government since 2016, so there’s a lot to catch up on.”

Patton’s most recent position was as city manager of Herrington. Patton also served as the Mayor of Leon.

Born in Alaska, he and his family moved to Kansas, where he graduated from high school in Burden.

“After graduation, I spent several years working in a variety of jobs, at about 30 different places,” he said.

Patton then attended Wichita State University where he received his bachelor’s degree, then his masters degree in public administration in 2002. Patton also has a masters degree in public Finance from WSU, which he completed in 2006.

Patton and his wife Cherry moved to Sedgwick in the past few days. They have six children, 14 grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.

“We really like Sedgwick,” he said. “It’s clean and the people are genuine and friendly. I will do my best to take care of them; that’s my job.”

To continue reading, please see this week's print edition.

Read the rest of this entry »

City Ready To Inspect Repairs To Building On Main Street

Posted 5/17/2018

By Robb Reeves

HALSTEAD – Monday night, Halstead city council hung firm to a May deadline for repairs to be made at 204 Main, a building the city has flagged as having dangerous structural issues.

Last fall, the city cited the building as being unsafe, noting the facade was pulled away from the main structure 12-15 inches. City officials have blocked off the sidewalk on Main and placed a barricade around the building’s front.

The owner of the building, Denise Chesky, late last year presented the council with a plan to repair the building, working off a report the city paid an engineer to write.

The city set a deadline to have the repairs made by May 14 and Chesky appeared before council to give the governing body an update on what has been done. She said structural repairs have been made and she has asked for the city engineer to inspect the work. “We are ready for him to come out and check it,” she said.

Council agreed to that but not after expressing concern the repair was not completed by May 14 after several months were given to finish the work.

“We issued a completion date and time to get it done,” said council member Sam Farmer. He also said he hadn’t seen much activity at 204 Main but had noticed work being done Monday, the day of the hearing.

“I don’t have the confidence you will get done what you say you will get done,” he said, noting liability issues associated with the building.

Chesky said the building has had structural issues for years but it was overlooked by the city when other people owned the building. “I am a little irritated, quite frankly,” she said.

“I am ready for you to get the engineer out there,” Chesky said, as the hearing on her building wrapped up.

Council member George Torres said he would like to attend the inspection. Council agreed to not extend the time to complete repairs of the building but await the building engineer’s report.

To continue reading, please see this week's print edition.

Read the rest of this entry »