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State Could Shut Down Sedgwick EMS

Posted 2/9/2017

DIRECTOR of Emergency Services Jennifer Cisneros is stepping down at the end of the month. DIRECTOR of Emergency Services Jennifer Cisneros is stepping down at the end of the month. SEDGWICK—State regulators are eyeing the City of Sedgwick’s EMS department and it could face shut down.

Assistant EMS Director Mary Conrady said the department took a call from the state Tuesday morning.

At issue is the department’s staffing. “We have to send in a calendar at the first of every month to show that all shifts are covered,” Conrady said. “We have 14 open slots for February. The state told us they have never shut down a town’s EMS department before and Sedgwick could be the first.”

A special meeting was held Monday night by the EMS department, asking those on the roster to help get the slots filled. There are 11 volunteers on the current roster.

“We asked our people why they were not volunteering to fill the schedule,” Conrady said. “The mentality here is they want us to be taken over by another town, combining services.” She added that some of the longtime volunteers are fighting to keep the department open.

That lack of volunteers has led to the resignation of Director of Emergency Services, Jennifer Cisneros. Cisneros signed on to work 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and take some evening and weekend shifts. Instead she has found herself working 130-140 hours per week.

“I am very sad,” Cisneros told City Council Monday night. “I think this body needs to be completely honest with the next person and tell them exactly what is going on in this town. I have had full support of the City and I feel I have fulfilled my role.”

Cisneros also told Council there are a number of people in the community that have the certification necessary to help the EMS department, but they will not volunteer locally.

“I ask that you as a governing body reach out to these individuals and try to get them on board,” Cisneros said. “I do not know if it’s issues with past administration or politics, or what it is. I am very disappointed.”

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Tortoise Gallery Reopens This Weekend

Posted 2/9/2017

THE Tortoise Gallery, opening this Saturday, Feb. 11, has been relocated to 309 Main in Halstead. THE Tortoise Gallery, opening this Saturday, Feb. 11, has been relocated to 309 Main in Halstead. HALSTEAD—Halstead’s beloved Tortoise Gallery is reopening this Saturday. Owner and founder Mary Lee McDonald is excited with the opening and invites everyone to come by the gallery starting at 6 p.m.

Music will be provided by Outside the Walls.  Harrington and Co. will provide refreshments. Several area artists will be on hand to promote their creations.

McDonald plans for the gallery to offer crafting parties and classes on different art forms.

The new, more spacious venue, located at 309 Main, allows for more art to be displayed and room for classes. “We haven’t even opened yet and have two parties already booked,” McDonald said.

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New Omega Auto Clinic Specializes In European Cars

Posted 2/9/2017

HALSTEAD—Omega Auto Clinic, located at 117 East First St. where Mark’s eXpert Auto Care used to be, officially opened for business on Feb. 1, but owner David Long said even before that date he had several cars lined up to work on.

Omega Auto Clinic specializes in European-made vehicles, like Mercedes, BMW, JaguaDAVID Long opened up a new auto repair shop in Halstead on Feb. 1 called Omega Auto Clinic. 
DAVID Long opened up a new auto repair shop in Halstead on Feb. 1 called Omega Auto Clinic. r, Land Rover, Range Rover, Volvo and Porsche. While these might not be the most common vehicle type in Halstead, Long said he is counting on business from Wichita. He has a friend who runs a Wichita car dealership who is sending cars his way to be worked on. The two of them have had this arrangement for the past seven years.

He said he expects about 50-60 percent of his business to be European cars, but he’ll also still work on American or Asian models, focusing on vehicles 1995 and newer.

“I do have an older car here and there, but I don’t really want to get into 70s or 80s cars,” Long said.

He mostly does minor and moderate jobs, with occasional bigger jobs. He also provides oil changes and other services.

Omega Auto Shop has the actual dealer diagnostic computers for BMW, Mercedes and other European makes, which gives Long access to all the modules for every aspect of the car, whereas the average after-market tool may not even be able to communicate with all the modules, he said.

Long has about 15 years of automotive experience.

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