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July 20, 2017 
Harvey County IndependentJuly 20, 2017 Harvey County Independent

Contraption Makes Saw Safe For Kids

Posted 7/20/2017

JAXSON Euwer learns to use the kid-friendly saw with Tracey Srader and Bill
Tumbleson during the Dragon Kids summer program last week. Tumbleson made the child-safe saw and donated it to the program. 
JAXSON Euwer learns to use the kid-friendly saw with Tracey Srader and Bill Tumbleson during the Dragon Kids summer program last week. Tumbleson made the child-safe saw and donated it to the program. By Pilar Martin

HALSTEAD—Young kids working with table saws sounds like a dangerous combination, but thanks to a table saw contraption made by Bill Tumbleson of Halstead, area kids are having the opportunity to learn means of craftsmanship. Tumbleson has recently made and donated several of these safe table saws for kids to use.

Tumbleson has been woodworking for the last 10 years. He found the idea to make a child-safe table saw for his granddaughter on YouTube as an introduction to woodworking.

“The table saw uses a cutter called a nibbler,” Tumbleson explained. “It is not for cutting metal but for craft materials.”

The table saw does not appear anything like a saw, but rather a wooden box with what looks like a metal nut in the middle. That “nut” is actually the nibbler that cuts the materials.

The material can be moved around the nibbler either fast or slow, depending on the comfort level of the user. The opening around the nibbler is only 1/8 inch wide, making it safe for kids to use.

“We had a demonstration at Makers Space in Wichita and a 4-year old boy came right up and started using it,” Tumbleson said. “His parents had to drag him away.”

The table saw comes with a miter gauge and a fence, just like a real saw. These enable the user to cut certain shapes and measure their work.

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Cardinals To Cheer At Shrine Bowl

Posted 7/20/2017

SEDGWICK High School cheerleaders for 2017-18 are, back row: (left to right) sophomore Hadyn Anderson, junior Ashely Esposito, senior Tiffini Tucker, senior captain Bailey Zerger, sophomore Patsy Zerger and freshman Taylinn Lacey. Front row: senior Maddie Moore, sophomore Emma Rogers, junior Natalie Werner and freshman Anna Liby. SEDGWICK High School cheerleaders for 2017-18 are, back row: (left to right) sophomore Hadyn Anderson, junior Ashely Esposito, senior Tiffini Tucker, senior captain Bailey Zerger, sophomore Patsy Zerger and freshman Taylinn Lacey. Front row: senior Maddie Moore, sophomore Emma Rogers, junior Natalie Werner and freshman Anna Liby. SEDGWICK—Sedgwick Cardinal Cheerleaders get a once-in-a-life time opportunity when they head to cheerleading camp next Tuesday. Activities Director Diane Davison approached the school board with the idea to send the cheerleaders to the Kansas Shrine Bowl All-star cheerleading camp this year.

“It’s a really big deal,” said cheer sponsor Cristie Travis-Francis. “Not only is this the first year we get to go away for a cheer camp, but we get to send the whole squad.”

The 10-member cheer squad will leave on Tuesday, July 25, and attend camp Wednesday through Friday at Butler Community College in El Dorado.

During camp, the squad will be coached by elite collegiate cheerleaders. They squad will also participate in the Shrine Bowl parade on Saturday morning, July 29. During the actual Shrine Bowl game, the Sedgwick cheer squad will cheer on the sidelines in the televised event.

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Bentley Police Chief Reluctantly Agrees To 2018 Budget Cuts

Posted 7/20/2017

By Jared Janzen

BENTLEY—City council continued discussion of the 2018 budget during their meeting last Thursday after having held a work session on it the evening before.

In between the meeting and work session, City Clerk Lisa Wright had run the numbers, made some adjustments and discovered they still needed to cut a few thousand dollars.

Wright told the council the only place she had been able to find to make cuts was in the police budget, which was $41,080. She suggested eliminating the $1,200 allocated for unexpected vehicle maintenance and reducing the $2,500 for equipment replacement and unexpected expenses.

However, Police Chief Kevin Dorritie—who was not at the meeting at that point—had told her that if the police budget was cut below $40,000 he would have to reduce coverage hours.

“We can’t cut hours,” Council President James Roberts said.

“We all know what we’re all after, and that’s to keep the mill levy down as much as possible,” Mayor Rex Satterthwaite said. Wright said right now it was at 59.6 for 2018.

Unable to take action without Dorritie present, the council called him to the meeting. Dorritie said his preference was to keep the police budget as it was.

“The bottom line is, we’re not comfortable cutting to 40,000, but if it’s that big of a thing we’ll do it,” Dorritie said.

He said the city should be paying $50,000-70,000 for the coverage they get.

“We’re giving you the best service we can for the biggest bang for our buck,” he said. “We’re using a lot of our own equipment and our own old things; we’re borrowing from Peter to pay Paul sometimes, and we scavenge like no other when we can.”

Dorritie said there wasn’t any fluff in his budget and that was the amount he needed to run the department, yet added he was willing to work toward a compromise.

“We’re also team players and we understand the situation of wanting to keep the city’s budget down,” he said. “We have no problems with that.”

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