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October 5, 2017 
Harvey County IndependentOctober 5, 2017 Harvey County Independent

Zongker Competing At National Horticulture Judging

Posted 10/5/2017

By Jared Janzen

HALSCARTER Zongker shows off the fifth-place certificate she received from the State 4-H Horticulture Judging Contest in August. She is competing at the national level this week. Pictured with her is Scott Eckert, Harvey County Extension Agent of Horticulture. CARTER Zongker shows off the fifth-place certificate she received from the State 4-H Horticulture Judging Contest in August. She is competing at the national level this week. Pictured with her is Scott Eckert, Harvey County Extension Agent of Horticulture. TEAD—One young Halstead resident has a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to compete at a national level this weekend, but it’ll be in something a little more off the beaten path than sports or music. Carter Zongker, senior at Halstead High School, is competing at the National Horticulture Identification and Judging Contest in Indianapolis.

While she admitted she’s nervous, she’s also determined to do well.

“I have a drive to do good,” she said. “That’s just me in everything I do. I want to be the best.”

“She likes challenges,” added Zongker’s mother, Mikel.

Zongker took fifth place at the state-level 4-H Horticulture Judging contest on Aug. 19 in Manhattan.

Normally only the top qualifying team gets to go to nationals, which this year was Butler County. However, one of Butler County’s members was unable to attend, so Zongker was asked to go instead.

Harvey County took fifth in team scoring this year. The county qualified for nationals as a team in 2007 and 2012.

Kansas will have a strong delegation at nationals because all three representatives placed in the top five at state, and Butler County’s extension agent is calling it his dream team, Zongker said. 

“It’s something that’s never happened in Kansas before that the coaches and horticulture extension agents know of,” Zongker said.

Zongker’s high sore at state is even more impressive because she’s only been doing horticulture judging for three years. The two Butler County qualifiers she’s going with have each been doing horticulture judging for 10 years.

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Halstead EMS Recertifying Sedgwick Ambulance, Hiring Personnel

Posted 10/5/2017

By Pilar Martin

HALSTEAD—After months of negotiating between Halstead and Sedgwick, a three-year EMS contract has been approved and will go into effect Jan. 1, 2018. Halstead has been providing EMS services to Sedgwick since March 1 of this year.

So what happens now?

Halstead EMS Director Andy Lowe said the first order of business will be taking possession of the 2011 Chevy ambulance valued at $25,000. Sedgwick agreed to give up its EMS equipment in lieu of paying for EMS service from July through the end of 2017.

Lowe said the ambulance needs to have a KDOT inspection, then will be sent to be re-certified.

“That will take 45 days max,” Lowe said. “It will cost $9,000 to $14,000 just to get the ambulance ready for service.”

As for additional personnel, Lowe will be looking to hire an additional paramedic.

“We will begin that process the first of November,” he said. “We will hire another paramedic that will cover 24/7. We will also be looking to hire another person with EMT or higher qualifications. They will be on a rotating schedule.”

He also has been busy putting together a response operation. “We have gone through the supplies in Sedgwick are have everything rebagged, repackaged, and reconfigured,” he said.

Lowe said there are still first responders working in Sedgwick who receive the same 911 dispatch as Halstead.

“They can get to the scene first and stay with the patient until we get there,” Lowe said. “All transport has to done by Halstead. Ultimately, we want to make sure we are providing the best service to all citizens, not one town or the other.”

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Students Meet Semi-Pro Baseball Player

Posted 10/5/2017

MINOR league baseball player Collin Wiles, pitcher for the Frisco RoughRiders, was in Burrton last Wednesday visiting third and fourth grade students. His grandmother, Clare Stallings, is a para-educator for Burrton schools. MINOR league baseball player Collin Wiles, pitcher for the Frisco RoughRiders, was in Burrton last Wednesday visiting third and fourth grade students. His grandmother, Clare Stallings, is a para-educator for Burrton schools. By Pilar Martin

BURRTON—Burrton third- and fourth-grade students got to meet someone famous last Wednesday. Well, at least famous to his grandmother. Collin Wiles, grandson of para-educator Clare Stallings, is a pitcher for the Frisco RoughRiders, the Class AA affiliate of the Texas Rangers.

Wiles graduated in 2012 from Blue Valley West High School in Overland Park. He originally planned to pitch for Vanderbilt, but Texas came calling and he was drafted.

He was rated the sixth top player prospect in high school baseball at the time.

Wiles was a natural with the Burrton students, who were very excited to meet a real professional baseball player. Fourth-graders had Skyped with Wiles last year, meeting him through the computer. He started his visit by telling the students what his days were like.

“I get up at 10 a.m. each morning, and eat breakfast,” Wiles told the students, who gasped that he got to sleep in so late. “The games aren’t until 7 p.m., and they are usually over by 10 or 11 p.m., so it’s a long day,” he added.

Around 1 p.m., he heads to the field. The team eats lunch together and some of the players will spend time in an ice bath or whirlpool before hitting the field. They practice their respective positions, and everyone has battling practice.

“We work out to keep everything loose before the game,” Wiles said. Keeping muscles and tendons in proper shape is one of the most important things a baseball player has to do to keep himself from injury. He is in practice every day during the season.

Wiles lives in Frisco, Texas during the baseball season and then moves to Scottsdale, Arizona for the off-season.

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