Your browser version is outdated. We recommend that you update your browser to the latest version.

Contact Us:
The Harvey County Independent
220 Main St.
Halstead, KS 67056
316-835-2235

Search this site:

April 12, 2018
Harvey County IndependentApril 12, 2018 Harvey County Independent

Halstead Woman Turns Refurbishing Into Business

Posted 4/12/2018

WHITNEY Koehn, owner of Henry’s Chase in Newton, will help you find something special for your home or business.WHITNEY Koehn, owner of Henry’s Chase in Newton, will help you find something special for your home or business.By Pilar Martin

HALSTEAD—Whitney Koehn of rural Halstead has turned up-cycling into an art form. Koehn has always loved scouting estate sales, yard sales and auctions to find items she can turn into one-of-a-kind decorating pieces.

Koehn opened Henry’s Chase in Newton eight months ago. Prior to that he had first taken her decorating items to the Barn Sale in Hesston and had a huge response. Last year she and her husband Denis decided to clean out the barn at their home and had a market day.

“We could not believe the response,” Koehn said.

When the building at 108 W. Broadway in Newton came up for rent, the Koehns decided to take a chance. The store is named after a family dog, Henry, who loved to run. Business has been good and customers keep coming back. She wants customers to feel comfortable in her store.

“I want everybody to be able to afford something pretty,” Koehn said.

A lot of the items at Henry’s Chase have been up-cycled. Koehn will take apart a piece of furniture or two and repair, refurbish and paint it to make a new piece that is eclectic. She might take a chair with no bottom, paint it, then weave a seat out of muslin to make the chair new again but with a difKOEHN, a rural Halstead resident, collects and up-cycles items she finds to sell at her store.KOEHN, a rural Halstead resident, collects and up-cycles items she finds to sell at her store.ferent style.

And Koehn is willing to help you find a place for your new piece in your current decorating scheme.

“If you find some quirky little thing, it will work in your home,” she said.

She is branching out, starting to work with a local interior designer. The thing she loves about having her business in Newton is the local support.

To continue reading, please see this week's print edition.

Read the rest of this entry »

Adams Resigns From Halstead Council

Posted 4/12/2018

By Jared JanzenPHIL Adams was recognized for his 15 years of service to the Halstead City Council Monday evening as he has decided to resign. He was presented with a plaque by the governing body, from left, council members George Torres, Mike Wallace, Mayor Bill Ewert, Adams, council members Sam Farmer and Ed Campbell. PHIL Adams was recognized for his 15 years of service to the Halstead City Council Monday evening as he has decided to resign. He was presented with a plaque by the governing body, from left, council members George Torres, Mike Wallace, Mayor Bill Ewert, Adams, council members Sam Farmer and Ed Campbell.

HALSTEAD—After serving for 15 years on the Halstead City Council, Phil Adams has decided to resign. Monday evening at the start of a council work session he was recognized by the governing body for his dedication to the city.

“As far as I’m concerned, you exemplify the perfect council member,” Mayor Bill Ewert told Adams. “You come regularly to meetings, you are prepared for the meeting, you have good thought process, and it’s very obvious that you’re always very careful to spend the taxpayers’ money.”

Ewert added it had been a pleasure and an honor to work alongside Adams and that the city of Halstead has benefited from his 15 years on the council.

He noted that among Adams’s contributions to the city have been organizing the Old Settlers Festival Great Race for 27 years and helping oversee repairs to the Protector statue and its installation outside the depot museum last year.

“Those are just a few examples of the bigger projects, but I know that there were many others you were involved in, and you have always been a great citizen for the city of Halstead,” Ewert said.

Other council members also expressed their appreciation to Adams.

“I’ve always thought of Phil as my mentor on the council, and I really appreciate his wisdom,” Ed Campbell said.

To continue reading, please see this week's print edition.

Read the rest of this entry »

HHS Gym Getting New Floor This Summer

Posted 4/12/2018

By Jared Janzen

HALSTEAD—The gym at Halstead High School will be getting a new floor this summer, replacing the original floor from 1970.

USD 440 School Board members approved a bid for the project following a back-and-forth discussion of thickness options during their Monday night meeting. Since replacing gym floors doesn’t happen very often, it seemed that no one in the room was entirely sure which thickness option would be better.

“I’ve done a lot of things in my life, but I’ve never laid a gym floor,” Superintendent Tom Alstrom said.

They ended up choosing a three-quarters inch option over a one-inch option in a 6-1 vote.

Alstrom noted that one company had told him three-quarters inch thickness is the industry standard now and is used in college gyms. The current Halstead gym floor is an inch thick. The three-quarters inch floor would last about 38-40 years, whereas the years inch thickness would have a life expectancy of 75-80 years.

“That 75-80 years sounds great, but if the foundation rots out like ours did this time, it won’t matter,” said board member Korey Carmichael.

Athletic director James O’Brien said he thought either option would be “substantially higher” quality.

“There would be hardly any dead spots ever in the gym,” O’Brien said.

Concerning the gym floor’s lifespan, board member Shawn Kohr raised the question of whether the rest of the school building would even be in use in 40 years, 87 years after it was built.

“It may, it may not, but 87 years is a long time,” Kohr said.

The two companies that had given bids on the project noted that the condition of the sub-floor was a mystery.

“The gym floor itself is still good,” Alstrom said. “You could sand it five more times and still play on a good court. It’s what’s underneath that fell apart.”

In the end the board opted to go with the cheapest option, the three-quarter inch thickness from Patterson out of LaCrosse for $203,000, which was $18,000 less than the other bid for the same thickness.

Board member Randy O’Neal voted against the decision.

“I think thicker is better,” he said during discussion prior to the vote. “I don’t know why I think that.” He added that when building houses, thicker sub-floors are better.

To continue reading, please see this week's print edition.

Read the rest of this entry »