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Halstead, KS 67056
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July 5, 2018
Harvey County IndependentJuly 5, 2018 Harvey County Independent

Two Students Brighten Day For Terminally Ill Children

Posted 7/5/2018

BRIANA Winkel and Kristen Millspaugh pose with some of the 80 boredom kits they donated to terminally ill children in Wichita hospitals recently. The project was an assignment for their English class at Halstead High School. BRIANA Winkel and Kristen Millspaugh pose with some of the 80 boredom kits they donated to terminally ill children in Wichita hospitals recently. The project was an assignment for their English class at Halstead High School. By Jared Janzen

HALSTEAD—Two students at Halstead High School went above and beyond for one of their final projects this past school year. Briana Winkel and Kristen Millspaugh finished their sophomore years by raising money to purchase enough toys to create 80 boredom kits for terminally ill children at Wichita hospitals.

The girls said they hoped the toys and coloring books in the boredom kits would help these children keep their minds off their illness.

“They’re still kids, and they’re probably afraid of being in a place that they don’t know and having to stay there for a while, and so we’re hoping (the kits) will take their mind off it,” Winkel said.

The idea began with an assignment for their English class taught by Ashley Watkins. Students were given the choice of either doing a service learning project or a book project. Most of their peers chose the book project, but Winkel and Millspaugh partnered up and decided they wanted to do something to benefit children.

“We thought maybe kids in our community could help kids in different communities, and so we eventually came up with donating kits to hospitals and wanting to involve the kids in Halstead somehow,” Millspaugh said.

Winkel said the fundraiser was one of the biggest obstacles for them. They talked about having a bake sale or car wash, but time was limited with the end of the school year approaching. They decided to host a meal fundraiser at the American Legion as one of the weekly Wednesday-night fundraisers there.

Their original goal had been to make 100 kits at $20 each, setting the fundraising bar at $2,000, but given their time constraints they had to scale this back.

“We thought with just a few weeks of fundraising that’s quite a bit of money, so we were extremely happy,” Millspaugh said.

“Eventually we just kind of thought we’d just see how much we’d get, and then we decide how many baskets,” Winkel added.

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Community Garden Is Producing

Posted 7/5/2018

SHEILA Agee, left, with Trinity and Tatum, look over their garden plot.SHEILA Agee, left, with Trinity and Tatum, look over their garden plot.By Pilar Martin

SEDGWICK – The Sedgwick Community garden is already producing the fruits and vegetables of labor.

Cantaloupe, watermelon, tomatoes, peppers, corn, cucumbers, squash, okra, green beans and herbs are all taking off in the plots north of the water tower.

Rebekah Morse, who was the force behind the community garden, says everything is going well. Unfortunately squash in Morse’s plot was being decimated by some type of aphid.

“We will try and find something organic to deal with them,” Morse said. She pulled one almost dead plant out and discarded it. But she also took home some zucchini and cucumbers.

Other plots had beautiful eggplant, cantaloupe, even watermelon ripening on the vines. Some tomatoes and peppers have already been harvested and more are ready each day.

Sheila Agee was there with her three daughters.

“I have never gardened before, so this has been an experience. We started everything from seed.” Agee said.

Her two plots include sweet corn, okra, cucumbers and tomatoes. Her family was there to check on their produce and pull weeds.

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Council Discusses Boat Access Options

Posted 7/5/2018

By Jared JanzenTHE ramp at Riverside Park is steep and hard to navigate, and council members agreed that the best course moving forward might be to just allow carry-in boats like kayaks or canoes.THE ramp at Riverside Park is steep and hard to navigate, and council members agreed that the best course moving forward might be to just allow carry-in boats like kayaks or canoes.

HALSTEAD—Halstead City Council met with staff department heads last Wednesday for a work session to discuss boat access at Riverside Park, restrictions on four-wheelers and dirt bikes during Old Settlers, and the 2019 budget.

Since this was a work session and not a formal meeting, the council was only able to discuss these topics, and in necessary action will come at future council meetings.

The discussion on boat access at Riverside Park comes after the city recently cordoned off the area on the west side of town to prevent driving on the levee, as prescribed by federal inspectors. This leaves just Riverside Park as a place for boaters to access the water, and resident Dana Myers had spoken at the last council meeting on behalf of fishers who wanted a better option.

“There was no intent when we did the Riverside project to negate the use of that boat ramp, but at the time as we talked to council, most of the feedback we’d gotten on the boat ramp that exists in Riverside Park is that it’s too steep and the river was presumably higher judging from where the concrete ends because most of the time boat ramps end below the water level,” City Administrator Ethan Reimer said.

He said the Littler Arkansas River is considered a non-navigable waterway and therefore is considered private property except in political subdivisions where it’s public from bank to bank. He said in his conversations with adjacent property owners, they weren’t so concerned about people on the water, but people getting off the river and trespassing.

Council member Sam Farmer asked if the city would be contributing to a public nuisance by allowing boaters to go up the river. Reimer said City Attorney Brad Jantz was looking into some questions like this.

“If we put a ramp in, it would probably put us in the position of creating a nuisance for upstream landowners,” Farmer said.

Recreation director Grant Williams said he had some concerns about people using the existing boat ramp. He said he wasn’t thrilled about people backing up with trailers in that limited access point and noted there wasn’t a good option for parking a truck and trailer.

“I’m all for using an asset that we have, which is the river, but I just don’t think Riverside Park is the spot,” he said.

He suggested a better option for a boat ramp and trailer parking might be the unused property to the north that has not been tapped into. Some of this land is owned privately and some by the county. He noted this would be a big expense to benefit just a few people.

The top of the boat ramp has a concrete curb that was added as part of the park renovations this spring, but City Superintendent Pat Adams said if the city did allow use of the boat ramp, this could be removed.

Fire Chief Jim VanSchaick noted that in his experience putting the department’s boat in the water, the boat ramp was “very difficult” to use as is.

“I think the liability of somebody who doesn’t know what they’re doing exactly could hurt us a little bit because the angle is all wrong and the slope doesn’t work with a long trailer,” VanSchaick said.

Council members suggested defining limits on the type of boats allowed on the river to only small crafts like kayaks, canoes or jon boats.

“I don’t see an actual boat ramp like you’re going to see at Cheney Lake,” councilmember George Torres said. “I see maybe the ramp that we have and at the end of that a little floating platform where someone can drag their jon boat or kayak or canoe and get in right there.”

Moving forward, the council seemed to be in consensus to only allow boats that can be carried in.

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